Posts in fitness philosophy
Feel Good Friday - Working Through Injury

Many people, myself included, have grown up active and have been taught to push through a little bit of pain. We think that if we ignore the problem, it will go away. If I can do a little, I can do a little more. This often results in making the injury much, much worse. The sooner that you fully accept your situation, the quicker that you will be able to take control and get the appropriate care.

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Feel Good Friday: The Winning Mindset

Matters of mindset and mental approach have long been of interest in the world of athletics, but a recent abundance of research and literature on the topic has peaked my interest in how it can help all of us achieve our goals in and out of the gym.

Today, I’d like to mention a popular idea of Fixed vs. Growth Mindset, made famous by Stanford psychologist Carol Dweck in Mindset: The New Psychology of Success, as demonstrated in the graphic below.

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Part 3: Scapular Stability and Neck Freedom (No More Neck Pain)

The best and safest way to get the student to connect with this postural relationship is with a standing body weight lateral and/or rear deltoid raise, followed by a seated row and push-up. In the push-up and row, I usually see a faulty neck pattern. One in which the student is leading with the neck. Instead of using the scapular muscles in a synergistic way, the trainee will compensate by using the neck as a stabilizer. The neck is supposed to be free and this compensation will lead to neck and shoulder tightness and impingement's.

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The Trainer-Therapist model: The Future of Fitness

An interview with LMT Devin McGilvery. Devin and I have worked together for the last five years. In this blog, we share how we have united to help people move and perform better. Many trainers and therapist work alone, but the future of fitness encompasses a team approach to treating clients. Professionals from all walks of human performance, such as strength coaches, massage therapists and physical therapists, must unite to make a difference. Therapists expedite the restoration and recovery process, while coaches strengthen and solidify good movement patterns.

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How to breathe : The Power of Breathing

The ability to breathe efficiently and have control over one’s breath can be the key to unlocking strength, having more energy and managing stress (relaxation). Breathing is the facilitator of all human movement. Yet most people breathe incorrectly, which hinders their performance and can even cause chronic muscle tension and pain. 

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The Loaded Stretch - Stretching with a Purpose

 If you look closely at dynamic stretches, you will see they are the unloaded (no weights) version of strength exercises. If we maintain the same form under load, we will achieve optimal resting length. Also, if we think of the stretches as our weight lifting counterpart, we will ingrain that motor pattern. That stretch now has a greater purpose and will more readily transfer over to the squat rack or bench.

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Power with Age

In my last post, I described the need to develop strength before power.  Building a base of strength is critical before implementing power exercises.   Once this base is established, we can implement power exercises that will benefit us athletically as well with daily functional tasks.  We often assume that because power is dynamic in nature, it should be regulated to athletes and Olympic lifters.  Yet, power can play a significant role in helping us within our daily lives.  The truth is, older adults can greatly benefit from power exercises. Power loss occurs at twice the rate of strength losses and is a major performance quality associated with independence, fall prevention and faster recovery following an injury.  Once we understand the power spectrum, we will know what power exercises we can prescribe safely to our older adult students.

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